Does Size Matter for Trike Wheels?
November 30, 2022

Does Size Matter for Trike Wheels?

Does Size Matter for Trike Wheels? There are a lot of things to consider when buying your first recumbent trike. One thing that might have you stumped is whether the size of the trike wheels matter. What’s better? How does size impact the ride, safety, or even the look of the trike? There are many questions about wheel size you might want to be answered. Here we explain why you might consider one size over another with a technical overview broken down into layman’s terms. What Do You Want From Your Ride? We always tell our customers the type of trike features they choose all depend on what they want from their ride. For example, if you want the fastest ride possible, you’re looking at a 26-inch fast wheel. That’s because as soon as you put your foot on the pedal, it does a full rotation, so it pushes farther and faster. If you love the challenge of steep hills or happen to live in a particularly hilly area, a 20-inch wheel, with the small size and right gear ratio, allows you to climb hills with less effort. If you want a little of A and a little of B, the 24-inch wheel is right in the middle. Is It Just About the Wheels? That’s a good question. The gearing can help compensate for any wheel size. For example, a trike that has 16-inch wheels, in theory, are too small if you want to go fast. However, it is fast because it has the right gearing to go with it. As a result, it provides the speed and handling we love.  Wheel size does impact how a trike works, but manufacturers compensate for any possible challenges using gearing. It really has more to do with the trike design rather than just the wheel size. The wheel size makes some difference, but it is not everything. And that’s why you’re probably not going to feel much difference just by changing out the wheel. Gear is not the only thing manufacturers consider. The wheel also affects how the designers make the frames. For example, a race trike has a longer wheelbase that tracks straighter at the expense of handling. As a result, a trike like the GTS has a slightly shorter wheelbase. They still use a larger wheel, which has more to do with options for gearing. With standard gearing and a 20-inch wheel, you’re not going to get your speed higher than 18 to 20 miles an hour. Most of us don’t go that fast, so it’s not a problem. But for the real speedsters out there, it can make a real difference, especially going downhill. Why is Gear So Important? Gear is important because wheel size can limit gearing capabilities. Smaller wheels put limitations on gearing. As a result, choosing the wrong gear can mean you don’t have enough chain. For example, a 20-inch wheel is better if you need low gears for things like toting heavier loads or hitting hilly trails. You need more leg power, so lower gears are best. If you need higher gears, the 26-inch wheel is better at holding higher speeds, especially on rougher terrain. You’re looking at a 700c for a racing bike, as they are the fastest around while making high gears easier to access.   How Does Wheel Size Impact the Look? When it comes down to it, it often is all about looks. Before even worrying about wheel size, check out the trikes on display and decide which one appeals to your sense of aesthetics. Then you can find out the wheel size and other components to see if it’s a good fit. If this isn’t important to you, you can focus on other features to help narrow down your choices. Other Considerations for Wheel Size There are a few other considerations when it comes to wheel size. For example, some people like a 20-inch wheel on the front and the back. Why is this such a big deal? You can carry one tube in your emergency repair kit for flats instead of needing two tubes for a 20-24 or 20-26 inch trike. It’s not a big thing, but it does make it more convenient.  You also have to consider the overall size of the trike in relation to your vehicle or your storage space. The 20-inch is going to be the shorter one, so that’ll be easier to fit in the car or in a smaller apartment. If you want a larger wheel, it’s only going to fit in something like an SUV or pickup truck unless you go for a trike that folds. The folding trike is becoming more popular as people opt for smaller living spaces and smaller fuel-efficient vehicles. What About the Front Wheels? Another great question. Recumbent trike front wheels normally come in one size -- 20-inch. This is because the smaller size tends to be stronger. When you consider how you ride the trike, the front wheels face higher forces than the wheels at the back. Because of this, if the wheel on the front was larger, it wouldn’t have the resistance required to stand up to things like turns.  Remember, recumbent wheel size is a decision made by engineers who understand how the front wheel stands up to the punishment of even the harshest ride. As a result, there’s a lot of thought put into wheel design and diameter. Every detail of the wheel impacts performance and strength, including spoke angle and size. So, what we’re saying here is, if, for some reason, you have a sudden urge to replace your 20-inch front wheel with a bigger front wheel, resist the urge. It’s all about balance, strength, and engineering when it comes to front wheels. There you have it. Wheel size does matter, and it all depends on the type of ride you prefer. The larger the wheel, the faster the speed and the smaller the wheel, the less effort it takes to tackle things like hills or heavy loads.   Video Transcript Laid-Back Mickey here, going over does size matters in wheels? 20-inch wheels, 24-inch wheels, 26-inch wheels, what does it matter and why would you want to get one over the other? In this video we will have a special guest, Master Tech James, go over the technical side of the wheel choosing process. So, let’s check it out and here we go! People ask me all the time, “What’s the difference between a 20-inch wheel, a 24-inch wheel, and a 26-inch wheel” and “Why would I want one over the other?” I have a lot of people go “I want the fastest wheel possible.” So, I say, maybe we’re going into a 26-inch fast wheel that right when you push the pedal it’s doing a full rotation and it’s pushing off further. Some people will say that they need to climb hills a lot better and a 20-inch wheel, with the small size and the gear ratio, allows you to climb the hills a little better. And the 24-inch wheel is right in the middle. It’s that simple, but the gearing can be compensated for any of the wheels. So, one of my favorite trikes was a Green Speed GT and that one had 16-inch wheels. It was fast, but it had the right gearing to go with it. When it comes down to it, it’s about the looks. You figure out if you like the look of a 26-inch or 20-inch. Do you like the fact that a 20-inch has a 20-inch on the front and the back, which that allows you to carry one tube compared to a 20-24 or 20-26 inch which makes you have to carry two tubes when you are out on the road in case you get a flat tire? Which, hey, get thorn resistant tires if you don’t want a flat tire. And the cool thing is that some people ask “which one fits easier in my car?” Well, the 20-inch is going to be the shorter one so that’ll be easier to fit in the car. With the 26-inch you’ll have to either have a small SUV or maybe you get one that folds in order to fit it inside. Now let’s go ahead and talk to Master Tech James and see what the technical side of it is.Hi, I’m James the Master Technician of Laid-Back Cycles. So, the wheel size from a technical aspect does have little consequences on how they work. But in the big picture it doesn’t matter because the manufacturers compensate by gearing and it really has more to do with the trike design rather than just the wheel size. The wheel size makes some difference, but it is not everything. And that’s why the vast majority of us don’t really feel a whole lot of difference just by changing out the wheel. However, the wheel does affect how the designers make the frames. Like this race trike over here, longer wheelbase things track straighter at the expense of handling. Which is why the GTS has a slightly shorter wheelbase. They still use a larger wheel and that has more to do with options of gearing. With a standard gearing and with a 20-inch wheel we find 18 to 20 miles an hour is as fast as you’re going. Most of us don’t go that fast so it’s not a problem. But for the real speedsters it can make a real difference, especially on a downhill. So, it is easy to go into a rabbit hole on wheel sizes, but the truth is most of the manufacturers pick specific wheel sizes for what they are doing with the trikes. The number one reason that people get larger wheels in our experience is it looks good. Thanks James for the technical side of dust size matter and wheels. So, 20-inch wheels will help you go up the hill easier and 26-inch wheels will help you get going faster from the get-go. But you know, what if you don’t have the strength to go up the hill, what if you don’t have the strength to go faster, and you want to keep up with your friends? Check out this next video and I’ll show you how you can go up hills faster, keep up with your friends better, and we will see you on the next video.
Direct VS Indirect Steering on Recumbent Trikes | Which Is Better?
November 03, 2022

Direct VS Indirect Steering on Recumbent Trikes | Which Is Better?

Direct vs Indirect Steering We often have customers ask if they should go with direct or indirect steering for their recumbent trike. There really isn’t an easy answer, as it all depends on personal preference. One is not better than the other, and instead, you want to see which feels right for you. How one rides versus the other depends a lot on the overall design.  There are a lot of design decisions that will affect the feel, including the design of the handlebars, the angle of the head tubes on both systems, and the engineer’s vision when they designed the overall trike. Here we look at direct versus indirect steering to “steer” you in the right direction for your trike purchase. What is Indirect Steering? Indirect steering essentially puts the steering on a bearing underneath the seat and operates two tire rods. A plate is attached to the axis, which turns when the handlebars turn. Because of the way it's levered, it takes a lot less energy to move. Although you might find the initial movement is less, as you turn, it turns the wheel more. This can give you a little bit more stability when you're going really fast.  It also gives you a great turn radius which is perfect when you're on a single-lane bike path. However, if you love the rougher paths, you might feel less connected to the road and therefore not as much in control as you’d like. We find Greenspeed has one of the best steering systems out there. You can easily steer with one hand, and you aren’t likely to find it feels jittery at all. When you turn, it has a natural progressive feeling that you’ll appreciate. Pros of Indirect Steering When looking at the advantages of indirect steering, it’s all about enjoying less wheel vibration through the handlebars, which many riders find more comfortable. As well, if you tend to ride rougher trails, the indirect steering linkage absorbs some of that bounce you experience on uneven paths. When you combine indirect steering with front suspension, you can tame those rough roads and enjoy a better ride. Indirect steering also takes those turns nice and smooth, so you might feel safer. Cons of Indirect Steering Now on the less positive side of things, indirect steering can make you feel disconnected from the road, which can be a little disorienting if you like to go fast. Some people find this feels like they have less control, so if speed’s your thing, you might not like indirect steering as much. Keep in mind many people just need time to get used to how indirect steering feels at high speeds. If you ride a lot, the complex design of indirect steering can become harder to maintain, such as toe-in adjustments that are more complicated. What is Direct Steering? Direct steering has handlebars connected directly to the wheels. This has several advantages because, like a sports car, you enjoy the feeling of being directly connected to the road. You actually feel everything, allowing you to correct when you hit little bumps or divots on the path.  As a result, your reaction time is better because you have more input. That said, some riders might find this unpleasant, especially at higher speeds where everything becomes more pronounced. Direct steering is a simpler system run through a single tie rod. For example, the Gran Tourismo’s direct steering is very well-planted. You can feel the road, and you’ll have total control over it. You can move with little effort, even using one hand.   Pros of Direct Steering The main advantage of direct steering is you enjoy a better road feel. This is especially appreciated when you hit higher speeds. You’ll also find because it has a simpler design, maintenance is a lot easier than indirect steering, including adjusting toe-in. Cons of Direct Steering You’ll definitely notice more wheel vibration on rough roads, so you’ll need to keep your hands and arms relaxed to avoid getting jarred when you hit bumps. Which is Better: Direct or Indirect Steering? So, that still leaves us with the question, which is better indirect or direct steering? And it still leaves us with the same answer: it depends on what one feels the best for you. To help determine which side of the fence you probably sit on, here’s a look at the ride experience: Indirect Ride: If you travel fast, on smoother terrain and want to put less effort into steering, you might find indirect steering feels better. Also, if you tend to travel on smooth, single-lane paths, you’ll have less worry about those tight turns. You’ll enjoy less wheel vibration through the handlebars, and the trike will absorb more bounce when on rougher terrain for a smoother ride. As long as you don’t long to feel that true connection to the road and aren’t turned off by the fact the indirect steering trike is higher maintenance, this could be a good place to start. Direct Ride: If you live for a good road feel, high speeds and less predictable trails, the direct ride might feel better for you. You’ll always have that connection to the road, so feel you have more control. You’ll also enjoy the added benefit of easier maintenance. Just keep in mind this can also translate into a bumpier ride that can feel a little jarring. When it comes right down to it, you might not really notice much difference between the two types of steering. Where you will find the difference, or more aptly feel the difference is in the ride experience itself. You have to consider the trike as a whole, as opposed to the individual features and components. Triking is all about the experience, so you want to choose a model that makes you feel comfortable on the types of trails you tend to travel. If you are ready to take some trikes out for a test drive, the team at Laid Back Cycles is ready to help. We can discuss your preferred ride, physical ability and even things like storage so we can recommend the best models to take out for a spin.   Video Transcript  Hi, this is James, Master Trike technician at Laid Back Cycles. Today we are going over direct steering versus indirect steering. Which one is better? Okay, I got you there. One is not really better than the other, they are just different. Indirect steering essentially puts the steering on a bearing underneath the seat and operates two tire rods. Because of the way it's levered it takes a lot less energy to move. Also, the wheels can be engineered because of how they have the tire rods. The initial movement is less but as you turn, it turns the wheel more. This can give you a little bit more stability when you're going really fast; and also gives you a really good turn radius for when you're on a bike path and you have a single lane.  Now direct steering also has this advantage. As its name implies the handlebars are directly connected to the wheels. This has several advantages because like a sports car you are directly connected to the road. You actually feel everything, and you can correct when you have those little bumps or little divots inside of the road. You can react to it a little bit more because there's more input to the driver of the trike. It's a simpler system run through us a single tie rod. How it rides versus the indirect depends a lot on the frame designs and the steering designs. A whole bunch of things will affect the feel. The design of the handlebars, the angle of the head tubes on both systems, and what the engineer was thinking when they designed the overall trike. So, we're going to take these things outside and show you a little bit about the differences. The direct steering is very well planted. You can feel the road, you have total control over it, and the ability to move it is actually not that hard. You can do it with one hand pretty easily. This system on this Gran Tourismo is perfect. The Greenspeed, especially the GT20, has one of the best steering systems out there. One hand is real easy and it's not jittery in any sense. And when you turn it has a natural progressive feeling. This thing is great. So, we just got back from our ride over here and as you can see, in actual practice, there's not a whole lot of difference between the two different types of steering. There is a difference in feel though; so you might prefer one or the other. But again the trike is more important than the steering. You should be able to feel comfortable in it before you even get to that point. And then from there if you have two trikes that you like and one happens to be direct steering and one is indirect, pick the one you're most comfortable with. But if you want to know more about the subject you should check out this next video.
Affordable Recumbent Trikes in 2022
October 28, 2022

Affordable Recumbent Trikes in 2022

Affordable Recumbent Trikes in 2022 The cost of recumbent trikes can sometimes throw our customers off track. Recumbent trikes are specialty items filling a niche market. Because of this, simply put, they ain’t cheap. However, because they are becoming more mainstream, we have seen some price drops as more trikes hit the assembly lines. Here we explain what we mean by an affordable recumbent trike based on the competitive pricing we’ve seen in 2022. Cheap vs. Affordable in Recumbent Trike Terms First, it’s important to understand the difference between cheapness and affordability. Ask any elite brand in any category, from fashion to cars and trikes to computers, and they’ll always say cheap infers poor quality, while affordability is all about value. Because you get what you pay for, investing a few hundred or even a thousand dollars less in your trike honestly means you won’t be riding the safest trike.  It also means you’re going to run into more problems with the trike, including broken parts and an unpleasant ride. So, when you’re shopping for a recumbent adult trike, the last thing you want is to look for the cheapest brand. Instead, you want to look for the brands and models that offer the best value. What Price is Considered Affordable for Adult Recumbent Trikes? What would we consider an affordable trike? Our affordable trikes range between $1500 and $2750. If this seems like a lot, remember you’re getting far more value in this price range. This translates into a longer-lasting trike that is a joy to ride. It also means fewer breakdowns and costly parts replacements. Although a cheap trike might cost less upfront, you’re investing in a trike that is likely to prove too uncomfortable to ride.  We also like to point out to our customers that it does not cost $1,500 to $2,750 every time you ride the trike or each year you own it. It’s a one-time cost that can be broken down into affordable monthly payments. You’re looking at between $125 to $230 a month for a year. That’s very affordable, and once your year is done, so are your payments. Easy peasy. Value Increases Enjoyment and Use We’ve met a lot of customers looking to upgrade their recumbent. Many share something in common: They chose the cheaper model first. And we get this. You really don’t want to invest upwards of $1,500 for a trike you might never use. But here’s the irony in that: A cheap, poorly designed recumbent trike lacks all the benefits of a higher value model.  Therefore, you won’t enjoy the ride, so it ends up in storage, and you end up in front of your computer or TV. When you invest in the right trike, you’ll get far more use out of it, not just because it’s built to last but also because you’ll love it. You’ll never want to miss out on an opportunity to take a ride because you’ll feel safer, more comfortable, and less stressed so that you can enjoy the experience. That’s priceless because it keeps you fit so you’ll be around longer, living your best life. Recumbent Trikes are More Complex to Make Adding to the value of our recumbent trikes, there’s so much more involved in the manufacturing process. This is one complex trike with a lot more components and a state-of-the-art design that improves your riding experience. Recumbents reduce pain and allow you to get out there even if you have previously experienced back or knee issues on an upright bike.  The ergonomic design allows you to enjoy more comfort and increase the duration of your rides. You’re also safer because the trike has three wheels for added stability and is lower to the ground to avoid toppling. All these things are worth the investment when it comes to the pure enjoyment your trike offers. There’s just no getting around the fact the benefits of your trike impact the cost of production. But the manufacturers fulfill the needs of a niche market, and when done well, they provide the ride of your life. Here’s a breakdown of the components that impact the price: Special machinery to bend the broad tubing A wider seat costing an average of $200 compared to a saddle seat at just $5 Three wheels vs. two Specialty chain lengths to accommodate the trike’s stretched-out position Specialty steering Additional cable housing and tandem lengths Add the shipping costs to get the trikes to our store, and suddenly you’re looking at a higher price tag. Hopefully, you also see that the additional expenses are all justified, not just designed to make the manufacturers rich. The Dark Side of Affordable Recumbent Trikes There isn’t really a dark side, but there is an economic reason recumbent trikes are more expensive. As mentioned earlier, recumbent trikes are specialty items that meet the needs of a niche market. Because there is less demand, supplies are lower, and production costs are higher. As we see more adults aging and wanting to live an active lifestyle, chances are demand will rise.  Fingers crossed that an increase in demand will make it more affordable for smaller trike companies to increase production so they can afford to sell their trikes at a lower price. The more trikes they make, the more materials they need, and the less they pay for those materials. Buying materials in bulk always helps cut costs. Right now, they are ordering materials on a much smaller scale, which costs them more. Unfortunately, they have no choice but to pass on those expenses to the consumer. When you understand the difference between cheap and affordable, it feels less like you’re getting ripped off and more like you’re getting a far better ROI. There’s no denying the value of a high-quality trike and the years of enjoyment they offer. Laid Back Cycles carries an exceptional line of affordable recumbents. They offer high-end trikes that won’t cause sticker shock. Stop by to discuss your options, including financing, to make it easier to afford the best trike for your needs.   Video Transcript: Over the last decade when we first started at Laid Back Cycles, we brought on a lot of different trike manufacturers. We found that if you go cheap, that's different than affordable. Cheap means it really doesn't function the way you were hoping it to function. There's a difference between cheap trikes and affordable trikes. Affordable trikes are good quality trikes that work well, work well for what you want to do, but they're not that expensive. One of the number one brands out there is TerraTrike and they make affordable trikes. They make high-end trikes with some nice performance, but let's talk about affordability. TerraTrike was one of the first ones to come out with a trike under a thousand bucks - that was the TerraTrike Rover. It was a popular trike but it only had three speeds so they don't offer that anymore. But, they offer something with eight speeds and that's going to be the Maverick or even the Rambler. If you want no speeds you can go with the Rogue. They're all in that rambler frame style which is super comfortable, easy to ride, and is a nice cruise around trike. TerraTrike is one of the few manufacturers in the world that offers a lifetime warranty. That's for the first person that buys it for as long as they own it. If anything breaks on the frame, they will replace it. Parts are one year like everybody else. See terratrike.com for details. They believe in their product; they make a quality product. I know that you've seen out there on videos trikes in the 5 grand, 8 grand, 15 grand range. TerraTrikes are affordable nice cruise around trikes. For under two grand, those are the models that I would look at when I'm looking for affordable trikes. Once you start to get into about 2,500 bucks, that's the beginning of a lot of trikes. You're getting a great quality trike with TerraTrike. You also can start getting into the Catrike Villager so now you have some different choices to really choose from. Another way to afford a trike is financing. At Laid Back Cycles we offer up to 12 months of financing so you can take whatever that price is and then spread it across 12 equal payments. It makes it a little softer to chew or to digest, however you want to say that, and that's a great way to afford the trike that you love.  
Seat Height on Recumbent Trikes Explained
October 19, 2022

Seat Height on Recumbent Trikes Explained

Does Recumbent Seat Height Matter? Recumbent trikes offer a whole new world of comfort, safety and accessibility for cyclists looking for the best ride possible. When purchasing your recumbent trike, you want a design that is comfortable yet accommodates the type of experience you desire. Therefore, your level of comfort depends on where you ride, how you ride and your fitness/mobility level.  A major consideration for your comfort is your seat height, as it impacts how easy it is to get in and out of your trike as well as how easy it is to handle. So, seat height does matter when it comes to choosing the right recumbent trike. Here we explain why recumbent seat height matters and how to choose the right height for your needs. The Three Most Important Factors of Your Ride Where you ride your trike helps determine the trike features you need. We always ask a lot of questions about your ideal trail to get a feel for your needs, including: How difficult are the trails? Trails that are hilly, have lots of tight turns or are longer all present more challenges than a leisurely ride to the local coffee shop or your average, flat short trail at your favorite park. What are typical terrains and conditions? Trails with lots of bumps, gravel, mud, and potholes are more difficult to navigate than a well-maintained road or paved trail. If you only ride in pleasant weather, your conditions aren’t as tricky as riding in rain where slick surfaces present an issue. What are the surroundings and environment? Riding on roads with traffic or trails with a lot of wildlife present more dangers than a public park with visible pedestrians. Although both do require things that keep you visible and noticeable, being able to swerve more easily is more important in traffic or areas with a risk of animals jumping in front of you. While the features you need might include everything from a horn to reflective tape on accessories and from flags to fenders, the type of trails you ride on also impacts the best seat height. If you’re all about speed and adventure, then a lower seat is required, while leisurely community or rehabilitative rides call for a higher seat. Delta vs Tadpole Recumbent Trikes Seat heights are also based on whether the trike is a “tadpole” or “delta” style recumbent trike. Here are the differences between the two:   Tadpole Recumbent Trike The tadpole is all about speed and stability, and therefore these trikes are lower to the ground. The low seat height provides a lower center of gravity, making it safer to go fast. The front wheels also contribute to stability, especially when taking turns at high speeds. Because they are lower to the ground, the tadpole trike isn’t the right choice if it’s difficult for you to get down low. Delta Trikes The delta trike is more about accessibility of getting in and out of your ride than performance. Although they are just as safe as the tadpole, they do increase the risk of tipping if you take turns at higher speeds. If you want a trike that’s easier to get in and out of and are more about the journey and enjoying the trails than getting there faster, this is the type of trike for you. These trikes have medium to high seats. A bonus of the delta trike is that it allows you to link two trikes together to create a tandem trike. You can carry the pedaling power for a friend with lesser ability than you. Low, Medium or High Recumbent Trike Seats That brings us to the pros and cons between low, medium and high recumbent trike seats: Low It’s not surprising that the lower the seat, the harder it is to get in and out of the trike. If you have mobility issues or back or knee pain, the low seat can make it very difficult to enjoy your recumbent trike. Make sure you find it easy to get into and out of the seat, keeping in mind that although you might feel okay today, your ability to get in and out of your trike in the future is likely to change.  If you plan to enjoy simpler trails for years to come, you might want to avoid the lower seat. For those that have the need for speed and are quite fit, the lower seat provides a better center of gravity. Examples of low-seat recumbent trikes include Catrike 700, ICE Sprint, and TerraTrike Spyder. These trikes are designed for speed and efficiency. You are low to the ground to generate more power and don’t have to worry too much about tipping, even when taking a tight corner. Medium There’s always something to be said for that good old sweet spot that sits between high and low. The medium-height seat is good for most people, especially if you tend to enjoy touring. Good choices for medium-height seat trikes are the Catrike 5.5.9 and the TerraTrike GTS. These trikes take you farther, allowing you to travel for miles and miles in comfort. You can also feel safe at higher speeds if the spirit moves you. High For obvious reasons, the high seat is easier to get in and out of, making it the best choice if you have back or knee issues or just find it harder to get down low. That said, the higher the seat, the more difficult it becomes to take on corners at higher speeds. So, if you love to pedal faster and get that rush from pushing yourself to the limit, the high seat isn’t the best choice for you.  Good high seat recumbent trikes include the TerraTrike Rambler, Catrike Villager, Greenspeed Magnum, ICE Adventure. With these trikes, your high seat still offers a stable platform so you can feel both comfortable and confident when taking to local roads, as well as your favorite trails.   So, there you have it. The height of your recumbent seat does matter for many reasons. Our team can help you find the sweet spot for your trike for a safer, more enjoyable ride. 
Hub Drive VS Mid Drive | Electric Assist on a Recumbent Trike
October 12, 2022

Hub Drive VS Mid Drive | Electric Assist on a Recumbent Trike

Mid Drive vs. Hub Drive Motors Whether you’re all about the speed and want to accelerate your recumbent trike when out on the trails, find you’re tiring more easily, or just love the idea of getting further faster, e-trikes provide next-level riding experiences. However, you’ll have to make a few choices when shopping for your e-trike.  The first is whether you want pedal-assist or throttle power, and the second is whether you want a mid-drive or hub-drive motor. Unless you have limited leg strength, we always lean towards the pedal assist as it offers a far more enjoyable and intuitive ride. That leaves the mid-drive vs. hub drive option up for discussion. Here we look at the differences between the two to help you decide which is right for your needs. What is a Hub Drive Motor? Hub drive motors are located either at the front or rear wheel, with rear motors being the most common. As a result, they work separately from the gears. How Does a Hub Drive Motor Work? A hub drive motor applies torque directly to the wheel, which means it works separately from the gears of your trike. Torque refers to how much exertion the motor can provide. For many riders, this takes away from the intuitive, natural feel of the ride. It also reduces control over your ride when traveling complicated terrain that changes from hills to flat stretches. The rear hub is more common as it tends to put less wear and tear on your drive chain. Although hub drives can be operated with a throttle, the preferred systems are pedal assist, activated by pedaling using speed and cadence sensors. As you pedal, you trigger the motor, which stops when the pedaling stops. How Much Power Do Hub Drive Motors Have? Laid Back Cycles’ hub motors come in 350-watt and 500-watt options. If you enjoy basic riding, the 350-watt is recommended, while the 500-watt is best on hilly trails or if you need a little boost of power to tow a trailer. Hub motors also come with different battery options, which determine how many miles you’ll get out of the battery. On average, a hub motor battery will get you between 40 to 50 miles. However, you can opt for an extended-size battery to improve the travel range by about 20%.  What is a Mid-Drive Motor? The mid-drive motor is located between your pedals, applying torque to the chain or belt. As a result, they work in hand with your gears, offering more control when faced with varying terrains. How Does a Mid-Drive Motor Work?  Mid-drive motors are designed to be far more intuitive than the hub drive motor. As a result, the motor provides power differently. This torque-based system reads how much pressure you put on the pedals and uses a cadence and speed sensor to accelerate or decelerate. It also senses how fast the trike is going to calculate how much power is required. Mid-drive is much “smarter” than the hub drive, as it can also multiply its power across the drive chain because of its location. As a result, you can continually alter the power without worrying about adding too much stress to the drive chain. How Much Power Do Mid-Drive Motors Have? Mid-drive motors range from 250 to 625 watts, while dual batteries can reach up to 1250 watts. You’ll see varied ranges depending on how you use the motor, which can be as little as 20 miles and as many as 80. It all depends on the conditions you encounter while you ride, the power demanded throughout the ride and how you manipulate your gears.  While this might sound negative, it is actually one of the benefits of the mid-drive, as it allows you to control your ride and make the most of your battery life. You can use your bike’s gears to improve efficiency using a natural pedaling cadence to maintain a nice level of energy use for your battery. For example, you’ll experience better energy use when taking on a steep hill because you can shift gears. This isn’t possible with the hub drive motor. Which Motor Offers the Better Ride? Because the mid-drive motor applies torque to the belt or chain, they provide a more intuitive ride that provides the pleasures of pedaling with less effort. The position of the motor is centered which can also create a feeling of better balance compared to the hub drive. When riding the hub drive trike, you might find a rear hub motor that feels like you’re being pushed forward, while the front hub has a feeling you’re being dragged.  Typically, the mid-drive offers a more natural feel to the ride because they use torque and cadence sensors to improve the speed, while hub drives depend on cadence sensors alone. The additional input provided by the torque sensor considers how hard you are pedaling to improve the response. Just keep in mind not all mid-drives include a torque sensor when shopping around.   Consider Your Goals The best way to decide which motor is best is to consider your goals when riding your e-trike. For example, if you find you’re not up to pedaling as much as you used to, the idea of not pedaling at all has its appeal. If you either are tiring more easily or have leg strength or mobility issues, you’ll need an electric motor throttle as opposed to a pedal assist motor. Because it is very hard to find a mid-drive throttle, you’ll need to go for the hub drive with a throttle. If you’re looking to achieve higher speeds, want to extend your rides without tiring or want to get to where you’re going faster, the mid-drive is the answer. Mid-Drive Motor Pros and Cons Helps when climbing steep hills Retains a better sense of balance Offers a more natural feel to the ride Easier to change tires as they aren’t attached to the motor Could be more vulnerable to chain wear and tear if you aren’t using your gears properly Can be more expensive than hub drives Hub Motor Pros and Cons Less wear and tear on chains and cogs Still operates if the chain is damaged in most cases Less expensive in some cases Creates a pushing or pulling feeling depending on the location of the motor Most common on throttle e-bikes Changing tires is more complicated We always advise taking the time to test-ride your trike to make sure it feels right for your needs. While we tend to sell far more mid-drive e-trikes than we do hub drives, if you’re looking for a throttle motor, so you don’t need to pedal, the hub drive is your only option. Video Transcript: Hi, this is James, the master trike technician at Laid Back Cycles. Today we are going to discuss the differences between a hub drive motor and a mid-drive motor.  So, first off, the hub drive motor is as the name implies. The motor is in the rear hub of the trike and this has its advantages. With the hub motor driving the rear wheel, it doesn’t put excessive wear and tear on top of the drive chain. The hub drive can also be turned on by use of a throttle. Primarily though, the hub drive is activated by the pedaling. It’s what we call speed and cadence sensor. When you pedal, the motor turns on and when you stop pedaling the motor turns itself off. So, it is never going to keep you going if you are not pedaling. These motors come in two powers, the 350 Watt and the 500 Watt. The 350 Watt is recommended for general riding in most areas. The 500 Watt is useful if you are in a lot of hills or if you are towing something. And there are different battery options. This particular battery is typically good for about 30 miles minimum. Some people have gotten up to some very high mileages like 60 or 70, but most people are getting around 40 and 50 miles. And the extended size battery will add about a 20% greater range.    Did you guys know that 80% of you watching this video right now are not subscribed to the Laid-Back Cycles channel? Go ahead and subscribe to the channel and hit the bell notification to get all the cool videos that are coming up that will tell you everything you would ever want to know about trikes.  The mid-drive motor, like this Bosch on this Terratrike E.V.O., is kind of a misnomer in the trike world. It is called a mid-drive because in the world of bicycles it sits between the front and the rear wheel, there by calling it a mid-drive. But since trikes have the pedals up in the front it’s out in the front. I guess we could have called it a front drive motor.  The Bosch system is special, this one has a lot of electronics in it and it does a lot of thinking. So, the mid-drive motor operates with a combination of: How much pressure you put on the pedal, called the torque-based system. How fast the pedal goes, which is the cadence and speed sensor. And how fast the trike is going. And from there it does calculations to determine how much power it should put into the system. The mid drive-motors on top of the trikes have the benefit of multiplying its power across a drive chain. The Bosch is special because it continually alters the power to make sure it doesn’t give too much power and stresses the drive chain out at any given time. This is the most natural feeling of all the motor systems. So, which motor system is right for you? Well, for about 90% of people the mid-drive system is going to take care of you and because it is so natural feeling. If you have ever been on a regular unmotorized bike or trike and gone down a slight hill with the wind on your back, that’s what it feels like all the time. You know you are getting some exercise and our studies are showing that you only lose about 20% of the cardio. Current studies are showing that it follows a calorie burn and you are only losing 20% of the calorie burn on a motor vs a non-motorized trike. But because people spend more time on the motorized one, the net gains are huge. The hub drive is recommended for those with any adaptive situation, or if you are the type of person who is now getting a little tired on some of the bigger rides. With the cadence speed sensor, it’s the pedaling motion that determines how the motor comes on. You don’t have to push as hard, especially for the end of the ride. Also, the throttle is there to get you out of trouble if for some reason you cannot ride at all. People get that all the time from cramps in the legs. And unfortunately, that is what happens as we all get older. Regardless of what you need, we have a motor system that will work for you!
Electric Motor Throttle vs. Pedal Assist on Trikes
October 05, 2022

Electric Motor Throttle vs. Pedal Assist on Trikes

If you’re in the market for a new recumbent adult trike and are leaning towards an e-trike, you basically have two options: The electric motor throttle or The pedal assist   These options determine how the power is activated on your e-trike. So how do you know which one is best for you? Here we break it all down to help you decide. Electric Motor Throttle Think of the electric motor throttle as a mini motorcycle. You use a grip shift on the throttle to engage the motor, so your power kicks in. While this is a common type of throttle, there are also triggers and boost buttons available. Regardless of the type of throttle, you have the choice to do all the work, some of the work, or go full power for an effortless ride.  You control the amount of power desired with various e-trikes offering different levels of modulation. Modulation is important as it refers to how much control you have over increasing the power. Good modulation is gradual, while poor modulation is quick and comes in sudden bursts. Here are the pros and cons of electric motor throttles: Pros Many riders find the throttle is faster with more responsive power Best for country roads or high traffic areas Allows you to enjoy the ride completely motorized to spare your legs if you tire easily or have mobility issues Cons Poor modulation can be tricky in traffic Less efficient battery since the motor does most of the work Fixed gearing can’t be adjusted to suit the conditions of where you ride Can’t really contend with combined trails or roads where you need to constantly switch from cruising to hill climbing Requires concentration and puts pressure on your hands to control the throttle Some trails do not allow electric motor throttle use Why Choose Electric Motor Throttle? If you have limited mobility or leg strength or suffer from medical conditions that make it difficult to pedal, this is a good option for you. Pedal Assist Pedal assist, also known as electric assist, provides a boost of power when pedaling. Although some provide a “switch” for the power, all models require pedaling. Depending on the power levels of these e-trikes, you can improve your pedaling speed between 20% to 300%. Whether you want to get where you’re going fast without breaking a sweat, want to really accelerate to tackle the steepest hills on the trail or are looking for a gentle “push” pedal assist offers what you need.  Bosch motors are designed to respond to your needs so you can enjoy minimal pedaling resistance and reach accelerated speeds even at low cadences. Many systems, such as the eCAT use multi-sensor technology and fast information processing. As a result, you enjoy intuitive interaction that allows you to enjoy the type of ride you need when you need it. Here are the pros and cons of the pedal assist e-trike: Pros Much more intuitive compared to throttle e-trikes Suited for all types of riding, whether it is getting around town, easy trails or more challenging routes with steep hills Less pressure on your hands, focusing on pedaling instead of operating the throttle Mid-drive design provides better balance for the e-trike Excellent for climbing challenging hills because both power and pedaling are fed from the same area, so efforts are more balanced, and wider speeds are reached compared to electric motor throttles You get more mileage because some of the energy is shared through pedaling More acceptable to ride on national park trails Cons Not as good for riding in traffic as you don’t achieve acceleration quickly like a throttle Not recommended if you have severely limited leg strength or mobility Models without sensors can mean underperformance with unpredictable stop-starts and a lack of coordination between pedaling and power Can be pricier than throttle systems Why Choose Pedal Assist? If you love hitting the trails, going further distances, and having the option to accelerate or cruise in comfort, pedal assist is the better option. Two More Considerations When Choosing Your Recumbent E-Trike Here are two more considerations when choosing your recumbent e-trike:  1. Do You Enjoy the Ride? Expect to see a difference in the type of ride you’ll experience with an electric trike. You have to test-ride your e-trike to get used to controlling the trike, based on how you accelerate and decelerate or even take a corner. You’ll also see a difference between the throttle and pedal assist options, as if you love the feel of actually pedaling, you’ll really miss that with a throttle.  You want it to feel intuitive and comfortable, as comfort is one of the main reasons you’re choosing a recumbent trike to begin with. Make sure you like the way the trike feels and that it responds the way you expect so you feel safe riding, whether you hit challenging trails or head out to the corner store to buy some milk. 2. What Type of Ride Do You Want? How does the e-trike work, and can you handle it? Do you want to, and can you pedal, or do you want something that works to either boost your ride or take on the full load of the ride for you? If going for the throttle, do you understand how it affects your concentration and the use of your hands? Do you just want to get out there without worrying about keeping fit, or do you want to get the healthy benefits of pedaling? If you are avoiding body pain, where does the pain usually occur? If it’s in the hands and wrists, the throttle is probably not recommended. Do you ride in town more or hit the trails? All these things impact not just the type of power but the entire design of the recumbent trike. If you’re looking for a triking experience that offers the chance to go further, faster and with less effort, the pedal assist is the best choice. The electric throttle motor is really meant for those with limited leg strength and better suited to town riding, as many trails frown upon or even ban throttle use. 
recumbent trike rider on the trail
September 28, 2022

E-Trikes And Trail Usage

Classes of Electric Trikes in California While it’s hard not to get pretty psyched about the opportunities e-trikes offer for avid trikers, it’s important to understand e-trikes can introduce new challenges when using California roads and trails. In fact, with so many people opting for e-bikes as their preferred mode of transportation in California, a rebate was actually introduced to encourage people to invest in this eco-friendly option. However, that’s helping to put more e-bikes and e-trikes on our roads and trails. As a result, the California Highway Patrol is set to develop safety standards for e-bike riders based on new legislation. The new guidelines are expected to be introduced by September 2023, focusing on everything from e-bike safety to the rules of the road, with some emergency maneuver skills thrown in for good measure. The new guidelines will hopefully reduce the number of e-riders out there who don’t follow the rules, reducing the risk of accidents and injuries.  This brings us to the topic of this article, the classes of e-trikes and how they apply to the use of local roads and trails. Let’s take a look at the classes, as well as e-trike best practices, to keep you and fellow riders safe on the trails.  The Three Electric Trike Classes As of 2020, there are three classes of e-trikes/bikes: Class 1 A “Class 1 electric bicycle,” or “low-speed pedal-assisted electric bicycle,” is equipped with a motor that only functions when you pedal. As well, the trike can only reach 20 miles per hour (MPH) before it stops producing that boost of power. They must have a motor under 750W and be throttle free to align with California rules. The TerraTrike’s E.V.O. (electric vehicle option) is a perfect example of a Class 1 electric assist trike. It meets all the requirements, making it a popular choice for our customers.  With a 740W motor, no throttle, and a maximum of 20 mph, it meets the requirements of California laws and is actually not even considered a motorized vehicle. That means if you see trails with signs prohibiting the use of trails by Motorized Vehicles, you can safely continue on unless the sign states more specific trail use rules.   Class 2 A “Class 2 electric bicycle,” or “low-speed throttle-assisted electric bicycle,” does not require pedaling to use the motor. They also don’t provide assistance once they reach 20 mph. They are limited to motors below 750W but do have a throttle. Class 3 A “Class 3 electric bicycle,” or “speed pedal-assisted electric bicycle,” has a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling and stops providing assistance when the bicycle reaches 28 mph. Class 3 bicycles are limited to below a 750W motor, have no throttle, and are equipped with a speedometer. Pedelec and moped-style bikes fall into this category. This e-trike also meets the requirements of California’s e-bike rules as it goes to the maximum speed requirement of 28 mph. Common Sense and E-Trike Speeds If you shop around, you can find e-bike manufacturers that produce e-bikes that reach up to 60 mph. In our minds and the minds of California lawmakers, this is not an e-bike and becomes something more like a moped or mini motorcycle. If you choose an e-trike that allows you to go this fast, keep in mind you’re exceeding the 28 mph max in California, which means you’re getting into dangerous territory regardless of where you ride.  You’re kind of pressing the rules to work in your favor, and although chances are you won’t get caught zooming down local trails, you’re crossing the line between having fun and what boils down to common courtesy for your fellow riders and trail users. These types of e-trikes and bikes should never be used in public parks or on local roads as you really are putting yourself and others at risk. You’ll also definitely be breaking the law if you’re opening up the full-speed capabilities. Your reaction times also won’t allow you to avoid unexpected obstacles, which puts you and others at risk for serious injuries. Safety Tips for E-Trike Riders With all that said, you can enjoy a much safer e-trike ride with these e-trike rider safety tips: Make sure you wear a helmet no matter where you ride. To make yourself more visible, use front and rear lights and choose accessories with reflective stickers. Whether you are riding night or day, brighter colored, reflective clothing keeps you visible. E-trikes are nice and quiet, which means you might sneak up on fellow riders and pedestrians. Install a horn or bell to provide a little warning as you approach. Call out with a friendly “on your left” so people know which way to step to get out of your way. Make sure you only use trails and roads that allow electric trikes and stick to the designated bike trails and lanes in your area. Keep in mind your lower-to-the-ground position makes it harder for cars and pedestrians to spot you. Ride accordingly, so you’re prepared for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians who come into your path and present potential dangers that lead to accidents.  Don’t assume parked cars are safe. Watch for sudden vehicle lights that indicate the car is pulling out, as well as car doors that can open into your path. Keep an eye on fellow cyclists who can easily miss you and pull out in front of you unexpectedly. Until you’re used to using your motor, take potholes and uneven terrain at a slower speed to avoid losing control of your trike. Be aware of how your added speed can be interrupted when you hit gravel or wet pavement, and slow down accordingly. If you follow these e-trike best practices, you are more likely to avoid accidents and injuries. You’ll make the most of your e-trike experience without ruining it for others using California roads and trails. Our team can offer advice on the types of e-trikes available that are California compliant.
Storage Accessories for Recumbent Trikes
September 21, 2022

Storage Accessories for Recumbent Trikes

Whether you only use your recumbent trike to get around town or love to challenge yourself on long-distance trails, having enough recumbent trike storage makes a world of difference. Proper storage allows you to plan for the worst while enjoying the best trips possible. Here we look at our storage accessory recommendations for a safer, more enjoyable ride. The Flexible, Adaptable Trike Rack No matter where you roam, the trike rack is the go-to storage accessory. The TerraTrike Low Rider Rack sits behind and below the seat, so you maintain that center of gravity that makes you feel safer nice and low to the ground. It works for storing your electric assist batteries but is also the perfect base for your bags. From picnics to long weekends and riding to work to grocery shopping, you can use the rack for all your trips. The rack can be adapted to various TerraTrike models using the required, suitable fit kit. The Basket for Around Town If you’re out and about doing things like grocery shopping, the basket is your ideal storage companion. The Topeak MTX Rear Basket mounts to the rear rack with the MTX QuickTrack® system. It’s also perfect if you want to pack a lunch or snacks before hitting the local trails for a relaxing day of riding. Convenient Seat Bags Worrying about losing or holding onto your essentials is a thing of the past when you have the right storage solution. Pop everything into a convenient seat bag and travel around with confidence. The TerraTrike Seat Bag is a perfect example of simple storage conveniently secured over the back or bottom of the seat.  If you have to take the bag along with you when you arrive at your destination, it has handy handles. This particular bag has 187 cubic inches of storage, making it ideal for all kinds of essentials, including your emergency repair tool kit. Because of its position below the seat, you don’t have to worry about it getting in the way. Out of the Way Side Mounts Side mounts make it easy to travel with one or two bags in tow. If you already use a seat bag, you can add to your load using side mounts on one or both sides. The ICE Side Bag Mount, for example, fits a standard bicycle handlebar bag. Because of the convenient location, you can access things like snacks or drinks without having to stop. Mounts can carry up to 8 pounds each. Handy Pouch for Tools Your essentials are good in your seat bag, but for tools you take along on every trip, we recommend a pouch. They are small enough to hold things in case of emergencies like your tool kit, pump, and spare inner tubes and keep out of the way behind your mesh seat. When you don’t plan to take the bag with you when you reach your destination, you really don’t need handles. It’s the affordable solution for your basic, carry-along tools. Rackless Storage If you don’t have a trike rack and frankly don’t want to buy one, Catrike 700 Arkel Bag Sets are ideal. Unfortunately, they only work with the Catrike 700, hence the name. If that’s your trike of choice, these sturdy bags come as a set and require no hardware. They are of sturdy design, including a high-density polyethylene stiffener. There is also a bag designed for the Catrike Expedition. Two for the Road If you’re looking for mega storage, there are two bags we recommend: 1. Topeak MTX Trunk Bag DXP With Panniers This is Topeak's largest MTX trunk bag measuring 14.1” x 9.8” x 8.5”-11.4. It is also the most weather resistant using rigid molded panels and flexible 600 denier fabric. Its divided main compartment has a two-stage expanding top and a yellow interior so you can see what you need easily. That’s a game changer for riders who have minimum vision issues. Side panels zip open into full panniers, which add to its massive storage space. It requires an MTX QuickTrack rack with attached side frames for installation. Other fun features include: Clip for optional safety light Water Bottle Holder 3M Reflective Strip Carrying Handle Shoulder Strap 2. TerraTrike Stowaway Bag Make the most of that unused space between the seat and rear wheel with this ginormous storage bag. The U-shape bag nestles behind the seat without interfering with your rear wheel. The location also helps you maintain more control as it adds to the trike’s balance. When paired with other bags or racks, you can really increase your storage capacity. However, this bag alone has a whopping 931 cubic inches of storage space. It opens up completely with zippered sides and also has removable partitions. Interior mesh pockets are great for finicky small things, and each feature makes it feel like it was customized for your needs. It works with the TerraTrike Low Rider Rack and the Commuter and Expedition Panniers. Other features of note include: Secure velcro straps for mounting Reflective strip for added visibility Convenient Cup Holders You know how important it is to stay hydrated when out cycling. That means a cup holder is a must. The TerraTrike Bottle Pocket can be attached within arm’s reach and accommodates almost any size bottle or cup using a bottle retention cord. The strapping system is easy to attach, and it even includes reflective stripping for improved visibility. You can also use your basic Water Bottle Cage if you tend to travel with a regular bottle of water. Either way, be sure to keep water within reach, even when out for a short ride. From a cup holder for your beverage to a pouch for your tools and from a trike rack or basket to mega storage bags, the right storage for your trike keeps you prepared for whatever comes your way. For more information on recumbent trike storage, click here.
Comfort Accessories for Recumbent Trikes
September 07, 2022

Comfort Accessories for Recumbent Trikes

Comfort Accessories for Recumbent Trikes Recumbent trikes are designed for comfort. However, they might not be perfectly suited to your specific needs. The good news is you can customize your trike to bring it to the next level with easy-to-install comfort accessories. Here we look at some of the best options to optimize your ride for a more comfortable recumbent trike. Comfy Headrests for Neck Support Comfy headrests offer added neck support to help absorb shock. Some awesome choices include: TerraTrike Headrest Designed for all BUT the TerraTrike GTS and Spyder, the TerraTrike Headrest clamps to the exposed ribs of the seat frame for easy installation. It can be adjusted to suit your height with four settings. It offers an ultra-comfortable ride helping your neck absorb shock while deflecting moisture thanks to the closed-cell foam pad and Lycra cover. TerraTrike Sport Touring Head Rest (For GTS And Spyder) If you have a GTS or Spyder, don’t worry, TerraTrike’s got you covered. Designed for trikes using the TerraTrike Sport Touring Seat, you have the same features as above but with a gel pad that keeps you cool. Catrike Adjustable Neck/Head Rest This fully adjustable neck rest is a wonderful addition to Catrike trikes. You can find the perfect setting based on height and angle, making it easier to enjoy those longer rides without neck pain. Greenspeed Magnum Headrest Designed for the standard Greenspeed Magnum, this headrest clamps onto the seat cross brace. It adjusts to fore, aft and height, offering neck support cleverly designed to accommodate helmets. Bump Up Your Seat with Seat Pads Seat pads offer more cushion on your rides, making those longer trips more comfortable. Some excellent seat pads available include: TerraTrike Seat Pad Cover the entire seat with a pad that slips over the top and bottom ends of the seat. It stays nice and secure with a wide Velcro strap. You can choose between the standard pad for 16” seat frames or the wide pad for 18” seats. Enjoy the added pleasure of 1.5 inches of open-cell foam with a breathable mesh designed to wick away moisture. Ventisit - Mesh Seat Pad If you need ventilation, the open weave mesh on this seat pad keeps you cool even on the hottest days. It is also non-slip, so it grips to your seat to stay put. Improve Ergonomics What? You probably chose a recumbent trike because of its ergonomics. But no trike is perfect as they are built to accommodate people of all shapes and sizes. You can improve ergonomics with a few comfort accessories, including: TerraTrike Ultra Comfort Seat Wedge The Comfort Seat Wedge is perfect if you want to reduce forward shifting. It creates a raised area when used at the front of the seat, making it feel like you’re riding in a bucket seat. It can also be used at the top for added support in the shoulder blade area.    TerraTrike Lumbar Support Cushion If you love your recumbent trike but still find you have back pain, this customizable Lumbar Support Set can be positioned to customize support. It has three removable foam inserts of varying thicknesses and shapes that allow you to position the cushions precisely where you need the most support. They come with a breathable mesh cover allowing you to place the support between the mesh and adjustment straps of the seat for a secure fit. Increase Your Peddling Pleasure If you feel your peddles aren’t doing it for you, you can use a variety of pedal comfort accessories. For example, Shimano Pedals are clip-ons that combine the efficiency of the SPD system and the convenience of a platform pedal. You can customize the entry and release tension settings to make peddling more comfortable. There are also heel supports like TerraTrike Pedals that offer a complete foot platform with a strong, comfortable fit with two oversized straps and stainless steel ringlets. They even have reflective strips to make you more visible at night. If you have trouble getting in and out of your trike, the counterbalance on the bottom keeps your pedals upright. They are also great for people with special needs or motor control issues. Train at Home The SportCrafters Roller is the only trainer designed specifically for trikes. Whether it’s a rainy day or you want to maintain your fitness level with some time at home, the OverDrive Trike Trainer is the answer. It automatically adjusts in resistance as you change speeds. ARC technology means no manual adjustment is necessary. You also increase resistance at higher speeds, so you get the same challenge as you would out on the road. If you want low to moderate resistance, you just turn the trainer around. Easy peasy. Stay Dryer with Mud Guards Nothing literally puts a damper on your ride like a face full of mud or dirty puddle water. With Catrike's fender set, you can guard yourself against mud and water spray to keep dryer and cleaner on the muddy trails. Music and Communication If you want to use your smartphone to listen to music and keep in contact, the XL Smartphone Holder is the answer. It creates an “Instant Bike Dashboard” so you can access your mobile device when you hit the trails. It offers handlebar and stem cap mounts, so your phone is in the ideal position. A built-in lock mechanism holds the phone securely in place. Rocky terrain is no problem, thanks to bumpers that reduce vibrations. You can even answer calls without stopping because your phone is always within arm’s length. Reduce Wrist Pain If you find your wrists feel tired or painful when out riding, ICE Wrist Rests offer comfortable wrist support. This is the perfect solution for riders with limited grip or strength. They are easy to install, as they just snap onto your handlebar. They are also suited for any trike with a vertical 22.2 mm ø handlebar size. Don’t let discomfort interfere with your trike trips. Create a comfortable trike with these comfort accessories. For more information, click here.